Louise Saxton Embroiders Birds

Flaming Flamingo 2011– after John James Audubon, 1838  by Louise Saxton
Flaming Flamingo 2011– after John James Audubon, 1838 by Louise Saxton
Reclaimed needlework, lace pins, nylon tulle
116 x 98cm
(Image from Gould Galleries)
Flaming Flamingo 2011– after John James Audubon, 1838  by Louise Saxton
Flaming Flamingo 2011– after John James Audubon, 1838 (Detail) by Louise Saxton
Reclaimed needlework, lace pins, nylon tulle
116 x 98cm
(Image from Gould Galleries)

Is there anything more beautiful than a beautiful, beautiful flamingo, flying across in front of a beautiful sunset? And he’s carrying a beautiful rose in his beak, and also he’s carrying a very beautiful painting with his feet. And also, you’re drunk. (Jack Handy)

I can only imagine the hours and painstaking hours of effort that must go into the creation of just one of Louise Saxton’s beautiful works. Look carefully – you will see antique lace, tulle, glass beads and more in these fantastical needleworks. The minutiae of her pieces are what makes them, for me. And, of course, my love of all things ‘haberdashery*’! 

Where does she get her patience?

Queen Billie 2010 – after Sarah Stone, 1790 by Louise Saxton Reclaimed needlework, lace pins, nylon tulle  127 x 95 cm (Image from Gould Galleries)
Queen Billie 2010 – after Sarah Stone, 1790 by Louise Saxton
Reclaimed needlework, lace pins, nylon tulle
127 x 95 cm
(Image from Gould Galleries)
Queen Billie 2010 – after Sarah Stone, 1790 (Detail) by Louise Saxton
Queen Billie 2010 – after Sarah Stone, 1790 (Detail) by Louise Saxton
Reclaimed needlework, lace pins, nylon tulle
127 x 95 cm
(Image from Gould Galleries)

I collect, I dissect, reinterpret, and reassemble. (Louise Saxton)

The images in this post are taken from the artist’s recent exhibition, ‘Sanctuary too’, held at Gould Galleries in Melbourne.

For this series, Louise was influenced by natural history artists from the 1600’s to modern-day. She has reinterpreted specific works by developing an outline of an original natural history painting before building up layers, textures and colours of collected materials, and pinning and repining, until she is happy with the result. Just fabulous.

Halcyone & Ceyx 2010 – after Lilian Medland, c.1930 (detail) by Louise Saxton
Halcyone & Ceyx 2010 – after Lilian Medland, c.1930 by Louise Saxton
Reclaimed needlework, lace pins, nylon tulle
76 x 96cm
(Image from Gould Galleries)
Halcyone & Ceyx 2010 – after Lilian Medland, c.1930 (Detail) by Louise Saxton
Halcyone & Ceyx 2010 – after Lilian Medland, c.1930 (Detail) by Louise Saxton
Reclaimed needlework, lace pins, nylon tulle
76 x 96cm
(Image from Gould Galleries)
Major Tom 2010 - After John & Elizabeth Gould, c.1848 (Detail) by Louise Saxton
Major Tom 2010 – After John & Elizabeth Gould, c.1848 by Louise Saxton
Reclaimed needlework, lace pins and nylon tulle
103 x 49 cm
(Image from Gould Galleries)
Major Tom 2010 - After John & Elizabeth Gould, c.1848 (Detail) by Louise Saxton
Major Tom 2010 – After John & Elizabeth Gould, c.1848 (Detail) by Louise Saxton
Reclaimed needlework, lace pins and nylon tulle
103 x 49 cm
(Image from Gould Galleries)

To learn more about Louise Saxton’s work, or other artists represented at Gould Galleries, check out the website or visit them at 270 Toorak Road, South Yarra, VIC 3141. I have added them to my list for next time I’m visiting Melbourne.

* My brother refers to my love of craft endeavours as ‘haberdashery classes’. I think he just likes the word haberdashery, but Louise Saxton takes ‘haberdashery’ to a whole new level.

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Comments (11)

They are quite beautiful, it’s interesting how feather like lace looks.

SERIOUSLY cool, I think. And, quite beautiful.

I was due to post my attempt at ‘haberdashery’ but these are just stunning and I have ‘haberenvy’!

I love that, BCD – haber-envy!

But, you can’t tease me like that. I want to see your work. Pleeeeeeeease?

Those are absolutely astounding! What amazing talent!

There is NO way I would have half the patience required (even if I had the talent!)

So glad you included the details- they look like artwork within artwork. Love the Jack Handy quote. My all time favourite writer.

I’m going to have to read some more Jack Handy…

Just recently this blog has been a veritable mine of good things. Providores, fermentation, art….what more is there?

I’ve seen Louise Saxton’s work before and it was good to be reminded. I do think I need that flamingo. And also to read some Jack Handy.

PMB – If you have the flamingo, I might have to take Major Tom. Ever since moving to Australia, I have a wee thing for cockatoos. They are just so Australian!

Thanks for your lovely feedback – it was a very thoughtful comment. Made my day!

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